WILL DIET PROVIDE ENOUGH B12 AS WE GET OLDER?

First and foremost, we need to understand just how darn important B12 is to the proper functioning of our bodies.  Playing in the same physiological circle as B6, folic acid and betaine, which is called methylation, B12 plays a role in neurological function (depression, cognitive decline, Parkinson’s, Alzheimers), cancer prevention, cardiovascular function and bone health.  This is, of course, a brief list.

B12 needs proper digestion and stomach acid levels to be absorbed.  As we age, we lose the region of our stomach that produces stomach acid (parietal cells) gets worn away.  This leads to problems absorbing B12.  This is also a problem with stress and drugs that shut down digestion (Nexium, Prilosec, Aciphex, etc..).  Good thing that stress is not an issue in today’s society and that patients put on acid blocking drugs never take them longer than a few months…….

This study looks at whether or not the current dietary recommendations for B12 intake is adequate for an aging population.  The answer is definately no.  So what do we do?  Supplementation is very easy, but B12 levels in the supplement need to be high to overcome the poor absorption.  Our office uses a B12, B6 and folic acid lozenge that has 2,000 mcg of B12.  Not sublignual

For more than a decade, Dr. Bogash has stayed current with the medical literature as it relates to physiology, disease prevention and disease management. He uses his knowledge to educate patients, the community and cyberspace on the best way to avoid and / or manage chronic diseases using lifestyle and targeted supplementation.







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2 thoughts on “WILL DIET PROVIDE ENOUGH B12 AS WE GET OLDER?

  1. Dr Bogash,
    I enjoyed reading “will diet provide enough B12 as we get older.” The article ended
    with “Our office uses a B12, B6 and folic acid lozenge that has 2,000 mcg of B12. Not sublignual” It appears there was more information that was intended after
    “not sublingual.” What is the problem with sublingual B12 and why are lozenges more effective?
    Thanks,
    Jeff Valli

  2. Not that subligual is not effective, but there is no evidence that we absorb B12 easily via the oral mucosa in the mouth. The subliguals also are usually just B12 and not the other vitamins that it should be taken along with.

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