MITOCHONDRIAL DYSFUNCTION LEAD TO PARKINSON’S DISEASE – (12-09-04)

XENOBIOTIC METABOLISM IN PARKINSON’S DISEASE

I would have to say that we have PD pretty close to wrapped up. There has been strong evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction leading to loss of dopaminergic neurons leading to the symptoms of PD. Once that is understood, all the protective factors and the contributing factors really make sense.

This study found a very, very strong difference in the ability to detoxify between PD patients and controls. Along the sulfation pathway, only 30% of PD patients were able to sulfate greater than 5% of a dose of acetominophen–that leaves 95% unsulfated and able to increase oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Controls? 84% were able to detoxify greater than 5%. So, a reduced ability to detoxify leads to increased oxidative stress from damaging toxins; increased oxidative stress leads to greater burden on the mitochondria and greater potential for damage. Xenobiotic metabolism in Parkinson’s disease — Steventon et al. 39 (7): 883 — Neurology –

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For more than a decade, Dr. Bogash has stayed current with the medical literature as it relates to physiology, disease prevention and disease management. He uses his knowledge to educate patients, the community and cyberspace on the best way to avoid and / or manage chronic diseases using lifestyle and targeted supplementation.







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